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Resource Facilitation-Best Practices Manual for Return to Work/School

Resource Facilitation: Indiana Best Practices Manual for Return-to- Work or Return-to-School     Click on the read more button to get a link to download the full manual.  Once you… Read More

Multicenter Evaluation of Memory Remediation after TBI with Donepezil (MEMRI-TBI-D Study)

Multicenter Evaluation of Memory Remediation after TBI with Donepezil (MEMRI-TBI-D Study) March 10, 2015 Flora Hammond, MD (PI); Funded by National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR).  This study… Read More

Lifestyle Management in Spinal Cord Injury

New RHI Research Study, seeking participants: Lifestyle Management in Spinal Cord Injury: This pilot study is modeled on a successful lifestyle change program conducted at the University of Pittsburgh.  Based… Read More

Brain Injury Association of America ~ The Challenge

Flora M. Hammond, M.D. is featured as one of the TBI Model Systems Researchers in the Fall Edition of the Brain Injury Association of America ‘The Challenge’ Publication. Click on… Read More

Flora M. Hammond, M.D. Joins Medical Issues Panel of BIAA /Mount Sinai TBI Rehabilitation Guidelines Project

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE October 24, 2014   CONTACT: Stephanie S. Hale, BAA, Marketing Public Relations and Marketing Off.: 317-329-2093 Cell: 317-626-2910 stephanie.hale@rhin.com         Flora M. Hammond, M.D.… Read More

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Methylphenidate (Ritalin) and Memory/Attention in Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) March 26th, 2013

Brenna McDonald, Psy.D., Flora Hammond, MD, Gwen Sprehn, Ph.D.  Funded by Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD)

A   randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind design, comparing the efficacy of three interventions: memory and attention training (MAAT), methylphenidate, and memory/attention training in combination with methylphenidate.

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a significant public health problem, with 1.5-2.0 million Americans injured each year. Cognitive deficits, particularly in the domains of memory and attention are frequently the source of lingering disability after TBI and a source of enormous distress to the injured individuals and their family/caregivers. To date, interventions to ameliorate chronic cognitive deficits have been directed at either pharmacological interventions or cognitive rehabilitation. We propose to (1) To compare the efficacy of three interventions: memory and attention training (MAAT), methylphenidate, and memory/attention training in combination with methylphenidate and (2) use functional MRI (fMRI) to characterize changes in activation of the neural circuitry of memory and attention due to MAAT alone, methylphenidate alone, and MAAT in combination with methylphenidate. This is a two by two design with medication (methylphenidate/placebo) and cognitive therapy (Memory and Attention Training (MAAT) or an Attention control intervention) as possible interventions. Using a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind design, 200 individuals with persistent cognitive deficits 6-12 months after MTBI will be randomized to receive a six week trial of either (1) MAAT and placebo, (2) MAAT and methylphenidate (0.3 mg/kg BID), (3) attention control intervention and methylphenidate (0.3 mg/kg BID), or (4) attention control intervention and placebo. Symptom distress, attention and memory performance, and activation patterns of the neural circuitry of attention and memory while undergoing fMRI will be characterized at baseline, and after the four treatment conditions. This study will provide important information on three interventions for the most disabling sequelae of an enormous public health problem. Further, it will help to clarify underlying neural mechanisms and suggest additional treatment possibilities.

Contact Person:  Jessica Bailey at jnadkins@indiana.edu or 317-963-7516